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Forest Bathing

Bathe without getting wet.

Instead of in the water it's going to be in the forest.

Dive into the forest atmosphere.

Inhale.

Breathe.

Be still.

Listen.

Slow down.

 

Forest Bathing is a Japanese physiological and psychological practice is a process of relaxation; known in Japan as shinrin-yoku and has been implemented into the Japanese Health System since 1982 . The idea was to create something for the people of Japan, who were in need of healing through nature, and the purpose was also to offer an eco-antidote to tech-boom burnout and to inspire residents to reconnect with and protect the country's forests.

Forest bathing basically means immersing yourself in nature, using and being aware of your 6 senses. By walking slowly and being mindful you become aware of your senses - smell, touch, sound, taste, sight and your inner chi - and also of your surroundings. You essentially have a 'bath' in nature and absorb the forest or nature's atmosphere.

Experiencing nature directly through the senses helps us to slow down enough so we can get out of our headspace and reconnect with our heart sense and our bodies. This allows us to discover what is happening in the present moment both inside and out. Each walk you do is unique, depending on the setting and time of the day, the weather and the surroundings you are in.

Nature has been proven to have a positive impact on our mental and physical health. Spending time in nature has been shown to reduce stress and anxiety, improve mood, and boost overall well-being. Being away from our usual surroundings and emerging into nature we are then able to begin to see and create different ways to solve a current issue by developing a changed perspective on how we see and deal with problems. This gives us an opportunity to create new positive energy, make new choices, create action steps and instigate that much-wanted change we'd love to see and yearn for to create a more authentic, balanced and fulfilled life for ourselves.

Forest Bathing Waihaha Hut track
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